Call for papers Yearbook of Women’s History 2018

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Building bodies: Gendered Sport and Transnational Movements

Guest editor: Marjet Derks

The thrilling European title for the Dutch women’s football team, a pregnant Serena Williams winning the Australian Open tennis tournament, Kenyan-born Rose Chelimo of Bahrain becoming World Champion of the women’s marathon, and 66-year-old Pat Gallant-Charette being the oldest woman to swim across the English Channel – these are only recent highlights of female achievements in sport. In all respects, women’s sport participation and success is booming. In addition, ‘fitgirls’ have become part of popular culture. The 2018 volume of the Yearbook of Women’s History will focus on the making of ‘the sporting body’ as a concept full of ambiguous cultural meanings and impact. Marjet Derks, Professor of Sports History at Radboud University Nijmegen, will serve as guest editor for this volume, which will appear in the year of the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Traditionally, sport has been a masculine domain dominated by men and capacities that have culturally been ascribed to them. ‘The athlete’ was a competitive and if necessary an aggressive achiever and had outstanding physical prowess. Sport participation by women was never perceived as natural, but rather as an act of border crossing or even space invading that transgressed gender and sexual naturalness. For that reason, it was met with prejudice and oppression.

For a long time, sports history reflected this male dominance. Even though magazines gradually began to address sport as a pastime from the late nineteenth century, academic interest only became more prominent in the late twentieth century, when historical analysis began to address sport as a thoroughly gendered field (Bourdieu). Starting with the role of female pioneers and their self-empowering experiences through sport, research has expanded towards analysis of sport as a basically gendered performative culture, in which gender (femininity, masculinity and transgenderism) is done, affirmed and challenged. Moreover, questions have arisen as to how issues of gender have changed sport. More recently, the intersectional dynamics of sports have come to the fore, together with a focus on transnational discourses, representations and practices.

The 2018 Yearbook of Women’s History invites papers which discuss the historical formation, transformation and impact of gendered discourses, representations and practices within sport and physical culture. The focus will be international and comparative. We welcome contributions that consider the Netherlands (or former Dutch colonies), as well as other parts of the world, in a transnational analysis.

Possible topics include:

·         Sport, physical culture and (inter)national icons

·         Sport, gender and colonialism

·         Sport, gender and migration / migration culture

·         Sport, gender and religion

·         Sport, physical education and women’s labour

·         Athletes, gender and lifestyle

·         Gender verification within sport

·         Sport, gender and citizenship

·         Sport and sexuality

·         Football: the last male stronghold?

·         Challenging boundaries: female boxing, male figure skating, body building

·         Battles of the sexes

·         Sports journalism and gender representation

We invite authors from all locations to submit an abstract. Abstracts (max. 300 words) are to be submitted by 2 October, 2017 to Saskia Bultman (editorial secretary): s.bultman@let.ru.nl

Advertenties

Book Launch Yearbook of Women’s History 36

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Yearbook of Women’s History 36

Gendered Food Practices from Seed to Waste

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Wednesday 22 February 2017 / 15.00-17.00 at Wageningen Universiteit

Impulse / Wageningen Campus, Building 115        Stippeneng 2, Wageningen

 

Program

There will be coffee and tea upon arrival. Guest-editors Bettina Bock and Jessica Duncan will give a short presentation and hand over the first copy to professor J.M. van Winter, professor emerita of medieval history, expert in food history, and main benefactor of the Yearbook of Women’s History. Curator of the National Museum of Education Jacques Dane will give a presentation of his contribution to the volume on Domestic Science in and outside the Dutch Classroom in the period 1880-1930.

Please RSVP before 19 February to e.c.walhout@hum.leidenuniv.nl (Evelien Walhout).

 

About the volume

In nearly all societies gender has been, and continues to be, central in defining roles and responsibilities related to the production, manufacturing, provisioning, eating, and disposal of food. The 2016 Yearbook of Women’s History presents a collection of new contributions that look into the diversity of these gendered food-related practices to uncover new insights into the shifting relations of gender across food systems. Authors explore changing understandings and boundaries of food-related activities at the intersection of food and gender, across time and space. Look out for intriguing contributions that range from insights into the lives of market women in late medieval food trades in the Low Countries, the practices of activist women in the garbage movement of prewar Tokyo, the way grain storage technologies affect women in Zimbabwe, through to the impact of healthy eating blogs in the digital age.

Editors: Bettina Bock and Jessica Duncan (guest-editors), Eveline Buchheim, Saskia Bultman, Marjan Groot, Evelien Walhout and Ingrid de Zwarte

CFP: Gender and Archiving: Past, Present and Future

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Yearbook of Women’s History 2017 in collaboration with Atria on Gender and Archiving
Atria will be the Guest Editor of the Yearbook of Women’s History that will be published in May 2017. The volume is a follow-up of the international conference celebrating the 80th anniversary of the IAV-collection (International Archive of the Women’s Movement) that was hosted by Atria in December 2015. It will focus on the meaning and potential of archiving for enhancing gender equality and the position of women worldwide.

Call For Papers
There is an increasing interest in the significance of Women’s archives. Contemporary theory on gender and women’s archives and women’s libraries emphasizes that libraries and archives are more than storehouses of knowledge (De Jong en Koevoets 2013). Eichhorn, writing on feminist archiving, states that: “A turn toward the archive is not a turn toward the past but rather an essential way of understanding and imagining other ways to live in the present”(Eichhorn 2014). What is the meaning of archiving for the women’s movement then, now and in the future? What is the impact of practices of libraries and archives as they are undergoing profound transformations under the influence of new (technological) developments? What concepts, categories, discoveries, and theories can help expand our understanding of the meaning and potential of women´s archives and other institutions in the domain of history and gender research for enhancing gender equality and the position of women worldwide?

This issue will discuss these questions taking into account historical, contemporary and future perspectives. The focus will be international and comparative, looking at women’s archives from various parts of the globe and in different geopolitical settings. We would particularly welcome contributions outside Europe, notably on the role of women’s organisations in evolving democracies.

Abstracts (maximum 300 words) are to be submitted before 16 September 2016 to Saskia Bultman (editorial secretary): s.m.bultman.3@hum.leidenuniv.nl.

Presentation Yearbook of Women’s History 35

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The presentation of the new Yearbook of Women’s History entitled Gender and Activism. Women’s Voices in Political Debates (guest editor Mieke Aerts) will be integrated with the annual meeting of the VVG and award of the Johanna Naber-Prize on Friday April 15th (at Atria, Vijzelstraat 20, Amsterdam)! Do come!

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Programme (in Dutch):
13.30 uur: Ontvangst met koffie en thee
13.45 uur: Bezoek tentoonstelling ‘Omdat ik iets te zeggen had’- Nederlandse schrijfsters uit de 19e eeuw, in de bibliotheek van Atria. Organisator dr. Suzan van Dijk zal om 13.45 uur een korte toelichting geven.
15.00 uur: Lezing door prof.dr. Marita Mathijsen ‘Het zwaard in een fluwelen schede: De omfloerste scherpte van de vrouwelijke pen in de eerste helft van de negentiende eeuw’. Marita Mathijsen is emeritus hoogleraar moderne Nederlandse letterkunde aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Haar specialisme is de literatuur van de negentiende eeuw in Nederland.
16.00 uur: Feestelijke uitreiking Johanna Naberprijs 2016, met een korte presentatie van de winnaar.
16.30 uur: Presentatie nieuwe Jaarboek Vrouwengeschiedenis: Gender and Activism. Women’s Voices in Political Debates
17.00 – 18.00 uur: borrel na afloop.

CFP: Gendered food practices from seed to waste

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Call for papers for the Yearbook of Women’s History (2016)

Gendered food practices from seed to waste

Guest editors: Bettina Bock and Jessica Duncan

In nearly all societies gender has been and continues to be central in defining roles and responsibilities around food production, manufacturing, provisioning, eating, and disposal. Food–related work and practices along with context and cultures serve to construct and reinforce identities and social structures. At the same time, the gendered practices around food are complex and often contradictory. Much of the literature on gender and food explores these complexities and contradictions but continues to make use of dichotomies (i.e., rural/urban; local/global; producer/consumer; large-scale/small-scale; man/woman; past/future) that are increasingly less suited to critical analyses of the fluidity of experiences and science and thus limit our ability to better understand relationships between food and gender.

This raises questions about what then takes place in the in-between spaces, i.e. where producers are also consumers; where gender roles and norms are challenged; where local custom challenges global standards? What concepts, categories, discoveries, and theories can help expand our understanding of gender when it comes to food, and of food when it comes to gender?

The 2016 Yearbook of Women’s History will explore these questions by following food-related practices across time and space from ‘seed to waste’. Papers will consider gendered practices across the food production cycle across the globe from various disciplinary perspective and intersection points (i.e., age, race, sexuality, class) so as to uncover new insights into the impacts, implications and shifting relations of gender across food system, including practices undertaken in and across:

  • Food growing;
  • Processing;
  • Selling;
  • Buying;
  • Cooking;
  • Serving/service;
  • Eating;
  • Cleaning;

The deeply interdisciplinary special issue will bring together a diverse collection of innovative and accessible articles. In exploring the questions raised above, we encourage authors to interrogate traditional categories, dichotomies, and binaries and contribute to the advancement of understanding of the dynamics and relationships between gender and food. Above all, we are interested in papers that go beyond questions about women and food to explore changing understandings and boundaries at the intersection of food and gender across time and space.

We encourage authors of all disciplines and locations to submit abstracts (maximum 300 words) before 20 February 2016 to Evelien Walhout (editorial secretary): e.walhout@let.ru.nl

Short Bios of Guest Editors

Bettina Bock is Associate Professor in Rural Sociology at Wageningen University (The Netherlands). She is the editor in chief of Sociologia Ruralis. She holds a PhD in rural sociology based on a study of gender and rural development policy and practice defended in 2004. Her research projects include rural development and social innovation, rural gender relations, as well as sustainable food consumption and production.

Originally from Canada, Jessica Duncan is Assistant Professor in Rural Sociology at Wageningen University (The Netherlands). She is an Associate Editor of the journal Food Security and co-chair of the Food Policy and Governance Research Network of the European Consortium for Political Research. She holds a PhD in Food Policy from City University London. Her research areas include: food policy; food security; global governance; social practices; gender; and participation.